Saturday Walking

1 12 2012

For the past few months I have been going to the gym every Saturday morning which allows me to explore parts of Tokyo that I never took the time to explore especially on a Saturday morning and into the lunch time.  Three weeks ago, I decided to walk around Kanda Awajicho (a NY Times article on the neighborhood – slightly dated but mostly still true) and found little shops with interesting and modern Japanese things.  For lunch I stopped by a restaurant, an old establishment, offering monkfish dishes which was quite an experience.

IMG_5664

IMG_5667

IMG_5665

IMG_5670

IMG_5668

IMG_5669

IMG_5673

IMG_5675

IMG_5677

IMG_5672

IMG_5676

IMG_5678

IMG_5679

IMG_5680

IMG_5681

IMG_5682

IMG_5685

IMG_5683

IMG_5686

IMG_5687

IMG_5688

Sioya

Isegen


Actions

Information

8 responses

1 12 2012
Robin

Gym通い…偉い!

Like

2 12 2012
Ayako Mathies

Hai. ^^

Like

1 12 2012
charmedbylove

That last picture with the dice-like cube… is that a container for tea? looks really cute!

Like

2 12 2012
Ayako Mathies

I’m keeping salt in it. Too tiny for tea leaves. Wouldn’t hold a lot.

Like

6 12 2012
mkanamori

How was the monkfish prepared?

Like

7 12 2012
Ayako Mathies

Yanagawa style.

Like

16 12 2012
Jody and Ken

I love monkfish. When my wife and I married, we didn’t have much money and we cooked the food for our wedding reception, including futomaki and a monkfish bourride. In the US it’s sometime billed as “the poor man’s lobster,” which it certainly is not, but still delicious. Could you explain what the small wooden plaques bound with twine are used for? Thank you. Ken

Like

16 12 2012
Ayako Mathies

I didn’t know you ate monkfish in the US. And that’s interesting that you made futomaki for your wedding?! My grandmother (or more precisely her daughters including my mother) used to make futomaki for new year holidays (similar in importance to your Thanksgiving and Christmas) and I used to think that that was what everyone did but it was apparently just my mother’s family.

The wooden plaques are for checking in your shoes. The restaurant (opened in 1830) is in a Japanese house and you take your shoes off before you enter. Can you see how the numbers on the two sets of plaques correspond (33, 50 & 70)? The stringed ones I think were hung on the shoe boxes which lined the wall on the other side and the customers were given the plain ones. A guy sits on the green cushion and hands out the plaques and puts your shoes away.

Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: